Jamey Anderson: Comparing the ‘good old days’ to today

Jamey Anderson: Comparing the ‘good old days’ to today

Using our extraordinary powers of observation, humans have yet to find anything in the universe that remains static.  Everything changes.  Every single thing.  So far as we know, there isn’t a single entity, organic or nonorganic, that does not become altered over time.  Earth, the planet that humans call home, is constantly changing.  The Sun, the star that the Earth revolves around, is constantly changing.  The Milky Way, the galaxy that the Sun travels throughout, is changing.  Constantly.  Finally, the entire observable universe containing our own Milky Way galaxy is always, you guessed it, in a state of flux.  

It’s important to keep this perspective somewhere close by, because you never know when someone older than you is going to start complaining about “the good old days.”

The way I have things worked out in my head is that every American generation thinks that there is something wrong with the generations that come after them. They are too lazy, too entitled, too spoiled, etc.  Is this way of thinking entirely subjective?  Or is there some truth to the opinions of the earlier generations?  

I’m a middle-aged guy, so I can remember certain examples of normalcy when I was younger and compare them to the way things are currently done.  I’ll give you my opinions on what I think are both good and bad changes from then until now.

On to the good changes,  and the first thing I can think of is internet accessibility.  Its FAST these days, and its everywhere!  Back in the 90s, most homes had a designated room that the internet user would have to walk into and sit down in if they wished to get online. Since it was one user at a time, there were often fights over who got access to the computer. Families were surely torn apart by the constant struggle.

Another good change is the size and quality of the televisions we use today.  When I was growing up, I had a 19 inch square one in my room that weighed 450 pounds.  I felt fortunate to have it, and I was fortunate to have it.  The one in our living room was a little bigger.  It didn’t need a table to sit on.  You just sat it on the ground.  Besides, humans hadn’t built any kind of table yet that was strong enough to hold the weight of that behemoth.  It took 12 people to get it inside the house. At least none of us realized how grainy the picture was on it. 

Nowadays, most of us have a 1,500 inch high-definition TV in our living rooms that can be transported by a single adult who is holding a hot cup of coffee in the other hand.  That comes with access to 1,500 channels that we receive by plugging in a box that isn’t much bigger than a zippo lighter.  Most of us would rather watch sports on our TV, rather than go to the live event.

Now, I’ll discuss some of the bad.  The first thing I can think of is internet accessibility.  Its FAST, and it’s everywhere!  People don’t communicate on a person-to-person basis anymore.  We use a middle man known as our devices. Communication is more impersonal than the word “impersonal” now.  And it’s definitely a distraction for household family member interactions, if I’m putting it lightly.  Families are surely torn apart by the constant struggle.

Another bad change is the size and quality of the televisions we use today.  When I was younger we didn’t watch all that much TV.  There were not 1,500 channels to choose from.  We got bored with the same 20 channels over and over. We went out in the yard and played football, baseball, and basketball.  Just like God intended us to do, right?

By discussing these two examples, I found zero truth regarding which time frame was the better time frame to live your life.  And I strongly suspect that to be the case if I were to use all examples of comparison between any time frames.